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    Top 10: What to do in Buenos Aires!

    For a great insight into the Porteño culture, add these suggestions by ex-AMAUTA students to your to-do list when visiting the capital of culture of South America!

    1. Go Tango!
      The tango runs like a recurrent thread through the social and cultural activities program hosted by AMAUTA Spanish School in Buenos Aires. With us you get to take part in free Tango lessons or sign up for the professional Spanish & Tango course. Our excursions take you to the museum of the legendary king of tango: Casa Carlos Gardel and to a restaurant club showcasing elegant Tango performances. La Glorieta and 36 Billares put on some of the best Tango you’ll find in Buenos Aires!
    2. Fiesta Argentinian Style!
      Baires is listed in the top 10 nocturnal cities in the world. La Bomba de Tiempo and The Buenos Aires pubcrawl is an excellent way to take advantage of many happy hours and get introduced to the vibrant nightlife of Buenos Aires with its many fiestas, clubs called boliches and restaurant bars. Be prepared to revel until dawn!
    3. Top 10: What to do in Buenos Aires!

    4. Grill with top chefs!
      Argentina claims to have the highest quality meat in the world, and they grill the fine cuts to perfection anywhere you go. A parillada along with good wine and happiness is a very common way of socializing for Argentineans as this student’s testimonial points out. If you are not afraid to gain more weight while living in Buenos Aires, than finish your asado with an indulging ice-cream!
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    At AMAUTA Spanish School in Buenos Aires we focus on teaching the Spanish language while providing a full immersion experience into a vibrant new culture. What better way to do this than to join our new Wine Workshop in Buenos Aires!

    Our Spanish and Wine course is a godsend to wine lovers all over the world. You’ll spend four very entertaining afternoons learning all there is to know about the wine making traditions of Argentina, while you study Spanish in the mornings. Each workshop session is given in easy to understand Spanish (with English or Portuguese explanations when needed) lasting for an hour and a half, while the Spanish group classes are tailored to your comprehension skills, beginner or not.

    New Spanish and Wine course at AMAUTA Buenos Aires!

    The wine sessions are held off-campus, hosted by prestigious sommeliers at a classy vinoteca in Buenos Aires. You will get insight into the different varieties of Argentinean vineyards and grapes, the elaboration processes of espumantes for red, white and oak aged vinos and study the importance of pairing different types of wine and food and which combinations should be avoided at all cost. Each day you will get to take part in a wine tasting session, known as a Cata de Vino, of some of the best new wines produced in Argentina. You will appreciate to distinguish the unique exponents not found in wines produced for mass consumption. This event alone is reason enough for some students to take part in this program!

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    So what do you do when you study Spanish in Buenos Aires, you just watched an ‘Original Tango Show’ that sparked your imagination and got your energy going? You don’t just go home and sleep. Not in a city like Buenos Aires where you can go to the pharmacy all night long, buy a bouquet of flowers early in the morning while waiting for your 04.45 bus ride back to your barrio. After viewing a master Tango Show you end the night in style.

    We didn’t know where to go but sometimes you just get lucky. First we headed down to the Avenida de Mayo. The streets here are long and sometimes have over 5000 numbers but what the heck, we were in the mood and willing to walk. We passed some places that seemed ok, but not quite perfect.

    Grandeur and more (about how to end a perfect night in Café Tortoni)

    We crossed the widest street in the world, which at night is much easier and less frightening than during daytime, and all of a sudden I saw a sign up ahead. Café Tortoni. I had read about it and there it was, the place where Carlos Gardel and many, many other famous people had spent so many nights of their life. It was midnight, the streets where quiet and the place looked closed. Could I really be passing Tortoni’s without being able to enter? We couldn’t look in because white curtains where obscuring our view so I peaked through the crack between the doors and to my surprise I saw light.

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    Most of my fellow students here at AMAUTA had their living arrangements taken care of by the Spanish school. They all live in the vicinity of the school, somewhere in Belgrano. Ole, the Norwegian guy, lives with a landlady who serves him breakfast and dinner and Luca, the one from Switzerland, lives in a student residence together with other students. Every day they leisurely stroll to school, ordering their medialunas on the way to Av. Federico Lacroze 2129.

    I never thought about living with a host-family or together with other students because before I knew it one of my best friends had arranged for me to live in an apartment with an Argentinean girl. My very own place! In Holland I am used to having my own space for quite some time now so this was right up my alley. Of course, being from Amsterdam, I am also used to ride my bike wherever I want to go. Holland is a small country and you can get virtually everywhere within a couple of hours. Even by bike.

    The way to go…#1 (about the colectivo in Buenos Aires)

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    Tango in Buenos Aires

    The third dance in the history of dance done with the man and woman facing each other is the Tango. It consists of the man holding the woman’s right hand in his left, while his right arm is around her. The first dance done in this position was the Viennese Waltz, a craze which spread across Europe throughout the 1830s; the second dance was known as the Polka and was the next craze throughout the 1840s. Finally the Tango evolved into the third dance of its kind which greatly varied from anything before its existence because it introduced the great concept of improvisation for the first time.

    Tango in Buenos Aires

    The Tango soon after had a great influence on all of the “couples dancing” in the twentieth century. Its evolution was due to the great amounts of immigrants coming into Argentina which brought an array of new dancing with shocking new holds. It is, however, unknown as to how and when exactly the Tango evolved from the Viennese Waltz and the Polka into what it is today. This is due to the fact that it was everyday normal people who helped with the evolution of the Tango. They were the poor and the underprivileged that helped shape this phenomenon.

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